Mango Coconut Sticky Rice

MangoCocoRice_cover

Hello friends!

It’s been one whole week on the job (sort of – is sitting around watching other people do their jobs an actual job?), and I must say that the hospital that I’m in at the moment is vastly different from the one where I was. I haven’t quite decided which location I prefer, but I have located the source of the single tastiest soy milk in the city (thus far!) that is nothing short of a latte, minus the icky coffee part. All of the grown up sophistication of a foamy hot beverage, sans bitterness – basically my inner five-year-old’s dream come true.

In other news, a chain of Thai mango smoothie sundaes has apparently been taking over the country since I last came, and they’re basically about as magical as they sound. And while I’m in no condition right now to make my own version to share with the world, I figured that I would instead offer a mango recipe from the archives for another delightful Thai (and generally Indochinese) dessert: mango coconut sticky rice.

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This stuff is seriously addictive, mostly because it’s the ultimate master of contrasts: sweet and salty in the coconut syrup, warm sticky rice with chilled mango slices, and even chewy rice and succulent mango with crunchy sesame seeds (which are, granted, not so much traditional as they are aesthetically pleasing, but it makes for an incidental benefit!). It’s probably the ideal treat for indecisive people and/or lovers of eclectic mishmashes that somehow work nevertheless.

And while I’m rarely one to skip the directions on Casually Addicted Desserts, I must confess that this endeavor was the first time that I’ve ever made this dish, and therefore followed this recipe from Rasa Malaysia more or less to the letter. After perusing through their instructions, I can honestly say that the dessert is really more or less fool-proof: it just takes a little bit of patience, a sharp knife for thin mango slices, and less syrup (with more on the side!) to minimize runny-ness to get the plating just right. And while it may seem a little daunting, I’ve included some tips for forming pretty mango patterns, and I promise that the efforts are well worth it!

At any rate, if you’re looking for a gorgeous tropical dessert that everyone will absolutely adore, look no further and try your hand at Instagram-worthy mango roses. Hope you enjoy!

Happy Friday,
Anne

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Mango Coconut Sticky Rice

Follow this recipe from Rasa Malaysia!

Plating Tips:

  1. For Mango Roses:
    1. Peel a large Ataulfo mango and remove the pit by slicing off a large slice of mango flesh from each of the 2 flat sides.
    2. Take one of the halves and slice perpendicular to the length of the fruit (if you think of the fruit as a roughly oval shape, slice to form shorter slices rather than longer ones) to form thin slices about 1/8″ in thickness.
    3. Gently angle the slices such that they are offset from one another and lie about 45° to the horizontal, then slowly roll up the slices into a spiral. If the mango slices don’t seem to want to curl in one direction, try curling in the other. If the smallest “petals” on the outside don’t seem to fit the shape, remove them.
    4. Transfer the mango rose onto a pre-plated mound of sticky rice – I used a measuring cup as a mold!
  2. For Mango Sigmoidal Swirls (I have no idea what to call these):
    1. Peel a large Ataulfo mango and remove the pit by slicing off a large slice of mango flesh from each of the 2 flat sides.
    2. Take both of the halves and slice perpendicular to the length of the fruit (if you think of the fruit as a roughly oval shape, slice to form shorter slices rather than longer ones) to form thin slices about 1/8″ in thickness.
    3. Place both sliced fruits next to one another (left to right) such that the slices run from the top to the bottom of your cutting board. Remove the rightmost 1/3 of the slices from the mango half on your left and the leftmost 1/3 of the slices from the mango half on your right, then combine the remaining 2/3 of the 2 fruits. The end result should be an extra long mango “half” that has longer slices in the middle and shorter slices on the ends.
    4. Gently angle the slices such that they are offset from one another and lie about 45° to the horizontal, transfer the slices to a long plate, then gently manipulate the chain into an “S” shape. If the slices don’t seem to want to curve in one direction, try to curve them in the other.
    5. Add 2 scoops of mango rice (I molded them in an ice cream scoop) to serve!

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